Archive for May 2017

Update – Current Position at Liphook Equine Hospital

We are pleased to report that, further to the decision to take the precautionary step to cease movement of horses in and out of the Hospital, we currently still have no horses in the Hospital showing signs of EHV-1 infection. Our initial concerns began at the beginning of last week with a horse that was admitted as an emergency to the Hospital which was subsequently shown to be shedding a very low quantity of EHV-1. That horse is now back at home and doing well. To be clear, we have had no fatalities or serious illness from EHV-1 at any time here at the Hospital. We have detected trace amounts of EHV-1 in a nasal swab from one other hospitalised horse late last week. This horse is in our isolation facility and remains fit, well and shows no signs of illness. It is uncertain whether this horse’s swab result was a consequence of transmission from the original horse admitted to the Hospital or a pre-existing latent infection. All other inpatients were swabbed at the same time and all returned negative results. We continue to monitor all the horses in the Hospital extremely closely but currently have no horses with clinical signs of EHV-1 infection in the Hospital.

8th January 2020 – Isolation of horses at the Liphook Equine Hospital

On the afternoon of Wednesday 8th January, a case of Equine Herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) was confirmed at Liphook Equine Hospital. The single horse was managed in the Hospital under isolation conditions between the evening of the 6th January and the afternoon of the 8th January, when the horse returned home. Tests from the confirmed case revealed a very low level of virus. Some other horses on the yard from which the horse came have also developed symptoms indicative of an infectious viral disease caused by EHV-1 and known as equine herpesvirus myeloencephalopathy or “neurologic EHV”. Although not common, this disease is well recognised in the UK. We must remain vigilant about the possibility of transfer to other horses staying in, or visiting, our hospital who could contribute to further spread of the virus to horses elsewhere.

EHV-1 infection is governed by a voluntary code of practice that dictates that all movement of horses should cease while investigations take place. Thus, for the time being, all movement of horses both on and off the premises has ceased and we have chosen not to accept cases at Liphook Equine Hospital other than local life-threatening emergencies. We have contacted everyone who had a horse in the practice during this period and are confident that every precaution has been taken to implement appropriate containment measures. We remain hopeful that the period of isolation will not be prolonged, but this depends on further developments and laboratory testing.

Work by our ambulatory vets on the road will continue as normal and there will be instances where our veterinary specialists may be able to attend your horse at your premises or at a local practice in order to continue to provide services including elective surgeries, lameness investigation, gastroscopy and other diagnostic procedures. We are grateful to our veterinary colleagues in local practices who are working with us in the most productive and supportive way. Emergency referral admissions will be considered on an individual risk/benefit basis.

We believe our bold actions are essential for us to deliver on our commitment to observing biosecurity measures and to ensure the welfare of our patients and the wider horse population. We very much appreciate your understanding, patience and support during this challenging period. Please do call to discuss your individual requirements and we can run through options available to you.

For what to look for in cases of EHV-1 please see below:

Early signs of EHV-1 infection in horses are often just a fever with dullness and poor appetite. Respiratory signs such as a runny nose or cough might also be seen as well as enlarged glands under the jaw. In rarer instances more serious symptoms can develop such as abortion and abnormal neurological signs. If they develop, they frequently involve weakness and wobbliness of the hindlegs and tail and difficulty passing urine or faeces, although other odd behaviours are also possible.

Essentials of Equine Practice course: Friday 19th June – Sunday 21st June 2020

Do you have any members of the practice that would be interested in attending our Essentials of Equine Practice course?

This is a 3-day residential course held at West Dean College, Chichester, and at  Liphook Equine Hospital. The course is aimed for recent graduates and more experienced colleagues wishing to refresh their knowledge of general equine practice. The course is also suitable for final year veterinary students. The course focuses exclusively on what you need to know in ambulatory equine practice and has a very practical emphasis.

There is a charge of £495 which includes 2 nights’ accommodation, food and entertainment for all 3 days.

For further information please click here

If you would like to book a place (or places), please complete a booking form. For further information please email tasha.wilson@theleh.co.uk

VetPD 2-Day Wetlab: Ultrasound of the Equine Upper Limb, Neck, Back & Pelvis at Liphook Equine Hospital – 11th – 12th February 2020

VetPD 2-Day Wetlab: Ultrasound of the Equine Upper Limb, Neck, Back & Pelvis at Liphook Equine Hospital

11th – 12th February 2020

Early Booking Discount – Deadline: 5th January 2020

For more information, please click here.

Liphook Equine Hospital – Christmas and New Year Opening Hours!

We hope you and your horses have a happy and healthy holiday. However, should your horse need us we are open for emergencies 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

Please click here to see our Christmas and New Year Opening Hours!

Laboratory Christmas & New Year 2019 – 2020 Opening Hours

Please click here to see our Laboratory Christmas & New Year 2019 – 2020 Opening Hours

Liphook Equine Hospital has some exciting news to announce!

VetPartners has become the first UK veterinary group to set up a school of equine nursing.
 
The nursing school will be based at Liphook Equine Hospital in Hampshire.
 
The course will be led by Liphook’s Head Clinic Nurse and Head of Centre Rosina Lillywhite.
Please click here for more information

BEVA Congress 2019

Looking forward to seeing many of you at BEVA Congress this week – please do pop along to our stand and say hello.

Julie Potier joins the hospital medicine team

Having worked for 3 years at Liphook initially as a hospital assistant, then as a housevet and lately on the first opinion road vet team, Julie has recently taken a new position as an Internal Medicine Resident.

Registered with the European College of Equine Internal Medicine, the residency position consists of 3 years of clinical training, publishing research articles and attending/presenting talks at international congresses, before taking an examination to become a board-certified specialist.

Internal medicine specialists provide expert care for horses, ponies and donkeys with medical diseases. They promote research and contribute to increased knowledge and understanding of how diseases develop, how to diagnose them, how to treat them and how to prevent them.

Welcome to the hospital medicine team Julie,  and best of luck in your new role!

Liphook Equine Hospital invite you to an ‘Equine Educational Evening’ on Wednesday 18th September