Archive for October 2014

ATYPICAL MYOPATHY CLIENT MEETING – NEW DATE RELEASED Thursday 13th November

Equine Atypical Myopathy – Your questions answered!

In light of recent cases and the latest research of Atypical Myopathy, Liphook Equine Hospital invites you to the hospital for a short meeting to discuss what can be done to minimise this distressing disease.

We are holding 2 dates which are:

Thursday 30th October at 7pm – FULLY BOOKED 
and
Tuesday 4th November at 7pm – FULLY BOOKED

NEW DATE: Thursday 13th November 

Venue: Liphook Equine Hospital, Forest Mere, Liphook, Hampshire, GU30 7JG

Numbers are limited so to reserve your place please contact our reception team on 01428 723594, or by email: tasha.wilson@theleh.co.uk, or via our facebook page.

You are invited to a client meeting on Atypical Myopathy

Equine Atypical Myopathy – Your questions answered!

In light of recent cases and the latest research of Atypical Myopathy, Liphook Equine Hospital invites you to the hospital for a short meeting to discuss what can be done to minimise this distressing disease.

We are holding 2 dates which are:

Thursday 30th October at 7pm – FULLY BOOKED 
and
Tuesday 4th November at 7pm – FULLY BOOKED

NEW DATE: Thursday 13th November 

Venue: Liphook Equine Hospital, Forest Mere, Liphook, Hampshire, GU30 7JG

Numbers are limited so to reserve your place please contact our reception team on 01428 723594, or by email: tasha.wilson@theleh.co.uk, or via our facebook page.

Alert: Equine Atypical Myopathy

Several horses have been admitted to Liphook Equine Hospital suffering from atypical myopathy in the past week. We recommend that horse owners familiarise themselves with the clinical signs of the disease, and minimise their horses’ access to sycamore trees and seeds.

Atypical myopathy is a highly fatal muscle disease affecting horses in the UK and Northern Europe. It results in destruction of respiratory, cardiac and postural muscles.Affected horses need treatment with intravenous fluids, pain-killers and anti-oxidants, along with attentive nursing care and this is often best achieved in a hospital setting. 

Clinical signs of atypical myopathy:
- Weakness
- Muscle trembling,
- Lethargy
- Pain
- Recumbency (lying down)
- Discoloured urine (brown/dark red)
- Difficulty breathing
- Difficulty swallowing

Several horses from one location can be affected and outbreaks most commonly occur in the autumn.Recent scientific research has identified a toxin called hypoglycin A as the likely cause of atypical myopathy. This toxin is present in the seeds of sycamore trees (Acer pseudoplatanus), and it is thought that horses acquire the disease by ingesting sycamore seeds from their pasture. 
The concentration of hypoglycin A in sycamore seeds varies between seeds in the same pasture and even from the same tree. It is likely that the most important factors contributing to horses being poisoned by hypoglycin A are the availability of the seed in the field combined with a lack of adequate grazing or supplementary forage. An increase in cases is often seen after wet and windy weather, like we have experienced over the past week or two; perhaps the bad weather increases the number of fallen sycamore seeds on pasture.

Dave Rendle, one of Liphook Equine Hospital’s internal medicine specialists says: “In the past week we have treated several horses suffering from atypical myopathy. The sooner veterinary treatment is started the better, so we urge horse owners to be aware of the clinical signs, so that prompt veterinary treatment can be sought.”
“Also, we strongly recommend that owners prevent their horses from accessing sycamore trees and their seeds. If horses have to be kept out at pasture, owners can provide supplementary forage to reduce their consumption of sycamore seeds.” 

If you have any queries about protecting your horses from atypical myopathy,or if you suspect you horse may be suffering from the disease, please contact your vet.

 

 

Photo: Horses with atypical myopathy may pass dark red/brown urine

**** Pioneering surgery on the island – a UK first ******

A post from Vectis Equine Vets:

“Many thanks to Professor Andy Durham from The Liphook Equine Hospital for coming over to the island on Saturday to perform sight saving surgery on a shetland pony at the IOW Donkey sanctuary. To our knowledge this was the first time this surgery had ever been performed on a sedated pony in the UK. 

We are continually grateful to Liphook Equine Hospital for the support they give to enable our clients to have world class treatments here on the Isle of Wight. We may live on an island but rest assured the care you are receiving would not be available in most of the rest of the UK!! 

Jet had a nasty corneal ulceration on his right eye which presented 2 weeks ago. Normal treatments with antibiotics drops and intra-ocular plasma had failed to make an improvement. The ulcer was getting deeper and threatening to perforate which would mean the eye would have to be removed. 

Andy used a piece of equine placenta that had been specially prepared and then stored frozen at Liphook Equine Hospital. This “amnion graft” was then used as a biological bandage to cover the ulcer. The surgery was pioneered by Dennis Brooks at the university of Florida and has been performed in the states and at Liphook Equine Hospital. Normally the surgery would require a general anaesthetic so the graft could be sutured directly to the cornea. Alternatively the graft can be sutured to the margins of the eye (the conjunctiva) so the whole surface of the eye is covered by the graft. This is less fiddly and so can be performed in a sedated animal. So far this technique has been used twice on horses at Liphook Equine Hospital but as far as we are aware Jet is the first pony in the UK to have the procedure done under sedation. After the graft is in place the eyelids are then sutured closed over the graft to protect it.

We will open Jet’s eye in 7 days to see how we’ll it is progressing but it is likely the graft will stay in place for at least 2 weeks. We’ll keep you updated on his progress! “

 


 

ONLY THREE WEEKS LEFT to take advantage of the FREE* ACTH laboratory test fees.

Over the past three years, thousands of horses and ponies have benefited from being tested for PPID through the Talk About Laminitis initiative.

FREE blood test vouchers are available at:

http://www.talkaboutlaminitis.co.uk/.

The horse must not have been previously diagnosed with Cushing’s Disease.

*Journey and take blood fees still apply.

Remember, you ONLY have until 31st October to do this.